Schwalbe release Tire Booster for easier tubeless assembly

With the new Tire Booster from Schwalbe, tubeless tyre assembly can be accomplished easily. The light, handy cylinder can be used both statically and on the road.

Schwalbe Tire Booster 1.jpg
The Schwalbe Tire Booster in use at the Enduro World Series in Finale Ligure.

 

A powerful blast of air is required for tubeless tyre assembly so that the tyre bead quickly presses into the rim flange and the tyre is sealed. “Depending on the combination of tyre and rim, it doesn’t always work with conventional floor pumps,” explains Peter Krischio, Schwalbe Product Manager Race. In the professional workshop or at the garage, a compressor helps out.

 

For safe and easy fitting without a compressor, Schwalbe is now launching the Tire Booster, which was developed in collaboration with the British start-up Airshot. With it, a pressure of up to eleven bar can be immediately applied in the tyres. “The tyre immediately seats itself safely on the rim and seals everything evenly,” says Peter Krischio. “The Tire Booster is a significant advantage for assembly of tubeless tyres. At a light 435 grams, you can easily take it along on your trips.”

 

Schwalbe Tire Booster.jpg
The Schwalbe Tire Booster makes tubeless tyre assembly easier.

 

If you need an even bigger flow of air, a special adapter is also available. For this, the valve insert is removed and the adapter is screwed directly onto the valve spindle - the airflow is thus maximised.

 

And this is how it works: connect the Tire Booster to a conventional floor pump using the SV valve on the Tire Booster, fill the cylinder and then operate the quick-release valve. The air immediately distributes itself evenly and the tire seats itself - usually with the typical loud crack - firmly on the rim.

 

The Schwalbe Tire Booster will be available from December 2016 from specialist bicycle retailers for 59.90 EUR.






46 Comments

Hennie VR, Oct 25 2016 12:47

Did not even read the article.........just came here to read the comments.  :whistling:

BaGearA, Oct 25 2016 04:07

I built something like this for R120 with a fire extinguisher , few connections and a old compressor hose.

 

Keep that 60 EU    #macgyver 

Plentipotential, Oct 26 2016 11:15

I have a compressor so would not buy one but I can see the merit of this for cyclists with limited storage space at home or who do lots of stage racing.

 Looks like a neat product and not overpriced considering cycling prices.

V12man, Oct 26 2016 11:37

wonder if they tested that under conditions similar to a nice and toasty SA summer where the user brings a charged unit to a race, leaves it in the car (No shade) and comes back later.

 

I would think the pressure in that will increase substantially .... is there a release / safety valve at all in the design of the unit?

It's realistically only 11 bar in the cylinder.... and if it is similar to a paintball cylinder, then it can take several orders of magnitude more pressure...... more than enough safety margin....

V12man, Oct 27 2016 08:25

Hi,

I am not a MacGyver type of person, so not into the home made gismo's. If this will make the seating of a new set of tyres easy, with little hassel...I'm in.

Regards

Sarge

A compressor will be better still a LOT better....

Pipsqueak, Oct 28 2016 12:06

For R200 more you can buy a small compressor from adendorf
#justsaying

For about R5 I can drive to the gas station and use their compressor. What, like 5/6 times a year.

Edge_Design, Oct 28 2016 12:56

That is a lot of CO2 canisters for that price! 

 

Cheaper and probably more convenient (they don't need a floor pump as well!):

 

https://www.makro.co...ory3=Wheel Care

seven, Oct 28 2016 01:00

That is a lot of CO2 canisters for that price!

Cheaper and probably more convenient (they don't need a floor pump as well!):

https://www.makro.co...ory3=Wheel Care


Link doesn't exist...
😁

Skylark, Oct 28 2016 01:27

That is a lot of CO2 canisters for that price!

Cheaper and probably more convenient (they don't need a floor pump as well!):

https://www.makro.co...ory3=Wheel Care

That's a good point but cannisters can add up, especially when you have an annoying tyre that won't mount.

Simon123, Oct 29 2016 04:08

have compressor at home, and carry a tube on a ride.

 

Yay!  EUR60 saved. :)

JohanMalan, Oct 29 2016 04:40

A compressor does not always have a large volume of flow ,and very noisy, I gave mine to a friend and went back to  a large volume floor pump.

Bombs tend to congeal the slime.

The garage is a dirty ride in the car away from my bikeshed.

I think this is a fantastic idea esp on stage races or when touring.

If you don't get it then maybe you have not done a large range of tyres on various rims

JXV, Oct 29 2016 08:06

I have a high capacity 12V compressor in my 4x4. Remove tyre valve core, smear a little soapy water on the bead and compressor pipe direct onto valve tube. Hang the wheel from the tailgate. Never fails to seat the bead. Then fill sealant, fit the core and pump normally.

I can see the advantage of this air tank on trips and in the race carpark if you don't have a compressor.

11 bar is enough. Most domestic and commercial compressors for air tools are regulated to 100psi (about 7 bar) so that's what you'll most likely fill it to. There is enough leeway for a hot car. But if you pump it to 11 bar then rather keep it cool.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

seven, Oct 29 2016 08:13

I have a high capacity 12V compressor in my 4x4. Remove tyre valve core, smear a little soapy water on the bead and compressor pipe direct onto valve tube. Hang the wheel from the tailgate. Never fails to seat the bead. Then fill sealant, fit the core and pump normally.

I can see the advantage of this air tank on trips and in the race carpark if you don't have a compressor.

11 bar is enough. Most domestic and commercial compressors for air tools are regulated to 100psi (about 7 bar) so that's what you'll most likely fill it to. There is enough leeway for a hot car. But if you pump it to 11 bar then rather keep it cool.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk


I'm sure it must have a safety pressure release valve

JXV, Oct 29 2016 08:20

I'm sure it must have a safety pressure release valve

Didn't see one. Legally in most countries it doesn't need one unless it exceeds a certain pressure and volume threshold....I don't recall the values applicable in SA legislation.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

seven, Oct 29 2016 08:30

Didn't see one. Legally in most countries it doesn't need one unless it exceeds a certain pressure and volume threshold....I don't recall the values applicable in SA legislation.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk


Interesting... Then definately don't leave it 'loaded' in the car on a nice sunny gauteng day like today

ChrisF, Sep 19 2017 03:40

Didn't see one. Legally in most countries it doesn't need one unless it exceeds a certain pressure and volume threshold....I don't recall the values applicable in SA legislation.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

 

The pressure regulations used to have a "P x V" value, in the latest regs this was omitted.  any vessel over 50kPa now falls under these regs, with a small list of exceptions ....

 

Would be interesting to see the specialists debate if this vessel falls under the regs ... my guess, it does ....

 

 

 

all regs aside - few things as dangerous as compressed gas in a vessel !!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

This unit can, and should, be inflated with a floor-pump just prior to use.

ChrisF, Sep 19 2017 03:50

Had a perfect situation on Saturday where such a tool would have HELPED.

 

 

Tubeless conversion was done a few days before the event.  LBS clearly did NOT inform the rider of the process to ensure it seals properly .... just before the race she sees the front tire is very low on pressure.  

 

Grabbed my floor pump and quickly got that sorted ... to see the rear tire is just too on pressure.

 

 

NOPE !!  No way of getting air into that tire !!!!

 

Sludge sealed the valve ..... I removed the core and cleaned as much as possible. By this time the tire had debeaded and just no way to get it to pop back on .....

 

In this situation driving to the nearest petrol station is hardly an option.

 

 

C0 bombs ... just as well I did not start using my bombs, as cleaning the valve did not work.

 

Last resort was to use a tube for the race.

 

 

back at home this would not have been an issue, but with litterally minutes to spare before the start of the race that canister would have helped.

 

 

 

Note to self - I must see if my 12V compressor is up to the task ...

Shebeen, Sep 19 2017 04:06

Had a perfect situation on Saturday where such a tool would have HELPED.

 

 

Tubeless conversion was done a few days before the event.  LBS clearly did NOT inform the rider of the process to ensure it seals properly .... just before the race she sees the front tire is very low on pressure.  

 

Grabbed my floor pump and quickly got that sorted ... to see the rear tire is just too on pressure.

 

 

NOPE !!  No way of getting air into that tire !!!!

 

Sludge sealed the valve ..... I removed the core and cleaned as much as possible. By this time the tire had debeaded and just no way to get it to pop back on .....

 

In this situation driving to the nearest petrol station is hardly an option.

 

 

C0 bombs ... just as well I did not start using my bombs, as cleaning the valve did not work.

 

Last resort was to use a tube for the race.

 

 

back at home this would not have been an issue, but with litterally minutes to spare before the start of the race that canister would have helped.

 

 

 

Note to self - I must see if my 12V compressor is up to the task ...

did you not try filling up the tyre with no core, then you just pop it back in(quickly)? much easier to seat the tyre too.

ChrisF, Sep 19 2017 05:32

did you not try filling up the tyre with no core, then you just pop it back in(quickly)? much easier to seat the tyre too.

 

JIP, tried it without the valve core.

 

Just could not get it to seat ....

 

tried the valve a third time, and realised it was a gonner ....

 

With about 5 minutes before the race start we took out the rear tire and set about replacing the tube.

 

Ostrich Kick-15 (Small).jpg

 

Fitted yet another spare tube to the frame, while the pre-race talks were done ....

 

Ostrich Kick-16 (Small).jpg

 

The lady started stone cold last, and still won the ladies category over 55km !

 

 

 

In retrospect - POSSIBLE solutions :

 

- spare valve (complete tubeless valve)

- something to seat a tubeless next to the road (strong 12V compressor, floor pump with canister, this canister, CO catridges ....)

- BUT, do you want to struggle like this just before a race ???  For this type of situation, fit a spare tube.

- Then again, we drove up 500km to attend this event.  Let's say I noticed my tubeless had issues hours before the race .... at what point do I stop repairing the tubeless and go for a tube ....

 

 

I DONT presume to have the answers !  This incident has merely prompted me to think more about the options ...

 

Also realised I dont have insulation tape in my toolbox in the car ... despite having a full toolbox ...

 

 

 

maybe somebody learns something from this ....

ChrisF, Sep 20 2017 09:03

I bought the Ryder pump tank unit - thanks to a special I got this for less than the Schwalbe tank.  I always take the footpump with to events/rides So now I can also pop a bead if needed.

 

 

And I also bought a set of valve inserts ....  

 

 

So if last weekend does happen again I should be sorted !

ChrisF, Sep 21 2017 06:59

Murphy...... is ..... n ...... bl!ksem !!  :cursing:   :whistling:   :wacko:

 

 

Start my morning commute, turn back to just top up the pressure in the back tire .... and the more I pump the more air leaks out (using the old floor pump) .... ligte ... brille ... cant find the fault, try again ....

 

And the valve body breaks off !!  :eek:

 

 

fiets by die huis en twee karre by die werk ...