Questions remain over Wiggins package - British MP

British Cycling is still to provide proof a package delivered to Bradley Wiggins in 2011 contained only a legal decongestant, a British MP investigating doping in cycling said on Thursday.

Former British Cycling performance director Dave Brailsford told Britain's Culture, Media and Sport committee last week the package, sent to Wiggins during the 2011 Criterium du Dauphine, contained Fluimucil.

 

Attached Image: Bradley Wiggins.jpg

 

But Conservative party politician Damian Collins, who chairs the committee, said British Cycling had not been able to provide a paper trail backing up Brailsford's claims.

 

"It seems to be difficult to get precise records of exactly what was in this package, why it was ordered and the detail that you would want to know," Collins told BBC Radio 4.

 

"Dave Brailsford told the committee he'd been told by the team doctor it was this drug called Fluimucil, which is readily available in France, can easily be obtained and there are no restrictions on its usage.

 

"So if it's as simple as that, why get a British Cycling coach to courier it from Manchester via London to Geneva when you could have just gone to a pharmacy in France and bought it over the counter?

 

"That's why a lot of people looking at this say it looks odd, it doesn't look quite right."

 

The delivery has come under the spotlight after it emerged Wiggins, who retired on Wednesday, was granted therapeutic use exemptions for the banned substance triamcinolone prior to three major races.

 

Wiggins, British Cycling and Team Sky, Wiggins's former team, have denied wrongdoing and there is no suggestion they broke any rules.

 

Brailsford, boss of Team Sky, told the committee British Cycling coach Simon Cope had brought the package with him to France while he made a scheduled trip.

 

The Times on Thursday published a receipt showing Cope's return trip had cost £597.65 ($732.39, 699.28 euros).

 

After travelling to Manchester from southern England to collect the package, he flew to Geneva on June 12, drove to La Toussuire in France and returned to England the same day.

 

The newspaper said British Cycling president Bob Howden has written to the committee to explain it has been unable to access documents because they are "locked down" by UK Anti-Doping investigators.






18 Comments

Comments

Mamil, Dec 29 2016 12:49

It is extremely difficult to prove a negative.

rock, Dec 29 2016 01:21

15535559_1812599522298226_93961139550525

Kalahari Vegmot, Dec 29 2016 01:57

Yawn

BeegMig, Dec 29 2016 03:35

It's been more than five years. By the time they get past all that curly gingers,, who knows who could have tinkered or tampered with Brad's package? No findings will be credible, whatever the findings may be.

Thor Buttox, Dec 29 2016 03:40

First it was Linford Christie's lunchbox, now it's Wiggins' package. What's next, Lewis Hamilton's hamburger?

Patchelicious, Dec 29 2016 03:46

First it was Linford Christie's lunchbox, now it's Wiggins' package. What's next, Lewis Hamilton's hamburger?

Lewis got himself into the Douchebag Hall of Fame with his tantrums already, he doesn't need any extra help.

SouthYeaster, Jan 03 2017 04:57

Great headline....

eddy, Jan 03 2017 06:53

It is extremely difficult to prove a negative.


It is not necessary to prove the negative.

All Brailsford has to do is prove why it was necessary to bring the drug all the way from the UK and all the noise can disappear.

Patchelicious, Jan 03 2017 07:33

It is not necessary to prove the negative.All Brailsford has to do is prove why it was necessary to bring the drug all the way from the UK and all the noise can disappear.


What if it is like they say, and a dude was on his way already.

"Hey dude, you still coming to the braai? Yes? Cool, please pick up some ice on the way"

eddy, Jan 03 2017 08:50

What if it is like they say, and a dude was on his way already.
"Hey dude, you still coming to the braai? Yes? Cool, please pick up some ice on the way"


The dude had to go from "the south of England" to Manchester to collect before flying to Geneva.

So it is more like "dude, please pick up some ice on your way but don't get it from the Shell garage on your way but go to my mate in Potchefstroom to pick some up from him"

Patchelicious, Jan 03 2017 08:53

The dude had to go from "the south of England" to Manchester to collect before flying to Geneva.

So it is more like "dude, please pick up some ice on your way but don't get it from the Shell garage on your way but go to my mate in Potchefstroom to pick some up from him"


Aha! Gotcha!

I was under the impression it was "on the way to airport" type of thing.

Heard the ice from Potch is tip top though, maybe worth the drive....

Gen, Jan 03 2017 09:09

What if it is like they say, and a dude was on his way already.

"Hey dude, you still coming to the braai? Yes? Cool, please pick up some ice on the way"

He lied.. they said the guy delivering it was there to see another pro lady cyclist.. she was racing in Spain at the time[emoji53] there also is no paper trail.. Sky seem to be looking everywhere for it.. this after Brailsford said everything was handed to UKAD

kosmonooit, Jan 04 2017 03:44

Aforementioned do0d was on the public payroll as the Womem's National Coach and made this mission instead of running a requested training camp for the girls

geraldm24, Jan 11 2017 12:56

From Cyclingnews.com

 

http://www.cyclingne...campaign=buffer

 

Coming hot on the heels of a vigorous debate surrounding Bradley Wiggins' Therapeutic Use Exemptions for injectable corticosteroids, taken before the 2011 and 2012 Tours de France and 2013 Giro d'Italia, a report emerged in the Daily Mail that UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) were investigating "an allegation of wrongdoing in cycling".

 

It emerged that Simon Cope, a British Cycling employee, had travelled from the UK to France to transport a package containing unknown medication for Bradley Wiggins, delivering the 'jiffy bag' on the day he sealed victory at the Criterium du Dauphine.

October 7, 2016: UKAD confirm investigation into 'allegations of wrongdoing in cycling' after theDaily Mail's story on a medical delivery to Team Sky via British Cycling employee Simon Cope. 

October 8, 2016:UK Anti-Doping 'swoop' into British Cycling - investigators visited British Cycling at the Manchester Velodrome.

October 8, 2016:UCI president Brian Cookson, a former British Cycling president, pledged his cooperation with UKAD.

October 9, 2016:Pooley: Brailsford and Sky need to get their facts straight - Emma Pooley disputed Team Sky principal Dave Brailsford's comments that incorrectly stated that Simon Cope was in France to see her.

October 11, 2016:Cope: I don't know what was in the package for Team Sky - Simon Cope says he delivered a package, crossing two customs borders, but did not know its contents.

October 12, 2016:British Cycling physio faces questions over Team Sky's Dauphine medical package - Cope suggested that the package came from Phil Burt, a consultant with BC.

October 14, 2016: UKAD ramps up investigation into Team Sky and British Cycling - the inquiry includes allegations from Jonathan Tiernan-Locke that BC offered Tramadol to him while he was racing with the national team at the 2012 World Championships.

Meanwhile, speculation continued around what was in the package and whether or not Team Sky was operating in a 'grey area'. Former performance director Peter Keen said the case highlighted concerns he had already raised surrounding the connections between the publicly-funded British Cycling programs and the professional, privately funded, Team Sky.

October 17, 2016: Brailsford refuses to clarify contents of Team Sky's medical package
October 18, 2016: Froome: Impossible to say if Wiggins operated in a grey area 
October 19, 2016: Bradley Wiggins broke no rules, no grey area at Team Sky, says Portal
October 21, 2016: Peter Keen highlights seriousness of British Cycling and Team Sky allegations
October 24, 2016: Simon Cope to speak to UK Anti-Doping as investigation continues

 
Parliamentary hearing

In late October British Cycling was informed that Parliament's Culture, Media and Sport select committee had some questions about the case. The hearings took place on December 19, with Shane Sutton confirming that the package was delivered for Wiggins and was of a medical nature. David Brailsford then took the stand and said that he was told by the Team Sky doctor that the package contained the decongestant Fliumucil. But British Cycling executives said they had no knowledge this was the case, and have since been unable to provide documentary proof that this is what the package contained.
 
October 28, 2016: Parliament to look into Wiggins 'mystery package' - News shorts
November 9, 2016: Brailsford summoned to parliamentary inquiry into anti-doping and ethics
December 3, 2016: Froome still 'in the dark' over details of Wiggins controversy
December 9, 2016: Wiggins unlikely to face punishment over 'mystery package'
December 14, 2016: Cookson calls on Team Sky to give full disclosure of contents of mysterious Jiffy bag
December 17, 2016: UKAD investigation rolls on as Brailsford's parliamentary questioning looms
December 18, 2016: 'They can never take my package', says Wiggins in Instagram post
December 19, 2016: Sutton admits 2011 Dauphine medical package was for Wiggins
December 19, 2016: Brailsford says mysterious package contained legal drug Fluimucil
December 19, 2016: What is Fluimucil and why would Wiggins need it?
December 19, 2016: British Cycling deny knowledge of mystery package contents
December 20, 2016: Daily Mail claims Brailsford tried to 'kill' the mystery package story
December 20, 2016: Brailsford's failure to convince only fuels further scepticism
December 21, 2016: Brailsford facing further questions after conflicting statements emerge

December 21, 2016: A disaster for Team Sky and Dave Brailsford? Podcast from Parliament
December 22, 2016: British Cycling to hand over medical details to Parliamentary Committee this week
December 23, 2016: Wiggins' former doctor likens Fluimucil story to the Armstrong days
December 29, 2016: British Cycling unable to confirm contents of Wiggins' medical package
December 29, 2016: Nicole Cooke questions why Simon Cope was acting as Sky courier 
December 30, 2016: British Cycling warned about Team Sky relationship months before Cope's delivery

2017 season begins with Sky and Brailsford under scrutiny

January 7, 2017: Froome refuses to back Brailsford over recent controversies
January 8, 2017: UKAD chairman labels British Cycling's and Brailsford's parliamentary evidence 'extraordinary'
January 10, 2017: Brailsford determined to continue with Team Sky despite growing controversies

shaper, Jan 11 2017 01:02

Sir Dave Brailsford puts turbulent winter behind him to focus on Team Sky's fortunes

http://www.skysports...m-skys-fortunes

Barend de Arend, Jan 11 2017 01:17

It is not necessary to prove the negative. All Brailsford has to do is prove why it was necessary to bring the drug all the way from the UK and all the noise can disappear.

 

You've accepted that what they said was in the package was in the package.  You've bought half their story.

 

He has to explain why someone from the british ladies team had to go fetch and then deliver a package to someone from team sky men's team, and then go into the back of the bus to deliver it.

 

Then he has to explain why he tried to deny it.

 

 

When last did your buddy ask you to fly with "some meds" across border control?

eddy, Jan 11 2017 02:04

You've accepted that what they said was in the package was in the package.  You've bought half their story.

 

He has to explain why someone from the british ladies team had to go fetch and then deliver a package to someone from team sky men's team, and then go into the back of the bus to deliver it.

 

Then he has to explain why he tried to deny it.

 

 

When last did your buddy ask you to fly with "some meds" across border control?

 

We are on the same side here. I was just answering a specific question.

 

The whole story stinks and by the way it is even worse than you postulate. The courier claimed not to even know meds were in the parcel. He admitted it could have been anything.

Patchelicious, Jan 11 2017 04:04

We are on the same side here. I was just answering a specific question.

 

The whole story stinks and by the way it is even worse than you postulate. The courier claimed not to even know meds were in the parcel. He admitted it could have been anything.

So it could have been meds?