Riding forces are not symmetric. Why should your bike be?

On a bicycle, the drivetrain is mounted on the right side, the brakes on the left side, and the suspension (usually) around the center. When riding, the environment influences the wheels, and consequently the suspension and frame. When braking, it inflicts major forces on the left side of the bike, whereas acceleration and pedalling affect the right side of the bike.

 

Targeted Asymmetric design does away with the conventional stigma that a frame must be mirrored from drive side to non-drive side, other than for component integration.

 

Weight down - strength up!


Reinforced where it’s needed, lightened where it isn’t – allowing for a frame that is just as stiff but lighter, or alternatively more stiffness for the same frame weight.

 

In XC racing, where every gram count and efficient power transfer is crucial, Silverback applied lateral thinking with quantitative results.

 

Silverback Stratos sideview.jpg

 

Focus on the Stratos


Asymmetric tubes allow for the dispersion of shock forces between the top tube and down tube. At the riding sag point, most of the shock forces are directed along the top tube. At suspension bottom-out, the rear shock rotates and shock forces are split between the top tube and down tube via the single-sided support strut.

 

Silverback Stratos strut_image_2.jpg
Silverback Stratos strut_image.jpg

 

Support Strut (Shock brace) redistributes bottom out forces between the top tube and the down tube, which in turn is triangular for a more regular force distribution. By reducing peak stresses at points in the frame, the entire bike can be constructed lighter.

 

Silverback Stratos design-and-FEM-test.jpg

 

On a full suspension bike, this becomes even more important to have ‘balanced’ kinematic through the middle plane of the frame, that is not bias toward the drive or non-drive side. The drive side sees long periods of loading, of relative low to medium force. Where the non-drive side sees momentaneous loading, of a far higher magnitude. So very different forces – localised to a specific side.

 

All this asymmetry also creates a look unlike anything else on the market. It looks completely different from side to side. An added benefit to the offset frame profiles is - 'rider focused hydration' - front bottle is slightly offset to the drive-side of the frame for ease-of-access and good visibility when reaching for hydration mid-ride. Two bottle mounts in the main triangle. When it comes to water bottles, two is definitely better than one.

 

Silverback Stratos mariske_strauss_Cape_Epic.jpg

 

Silverback Stratos prototype.jpg

 

Burst Flex suspension


Burst flex suspension platform utilises flexible carbon seat stays, eliminating the need for a rotational pivot (bearings or bushings) in the rear triangle. Carbon fibre's properties work alongside the shock and leverage ratio to create a cohesive suspension platform. Elimination of a pivot point results a lighter frame that requires less maintenance.

 

Larger bearing used on the drive side, which has to contend with chain forces as well. A single piece carbon rear triangle with Flex-stays means fewer pivots and so less weight and less maintenance. User-centered design means that the service parts and even tools needed for servicing are off the shelf items and easy to find in any bike shop.

 

Carbon layup


The structure is mainly composited of T700 UD carbon fibre. Offering equilibrium in stiffness to strength ratio. The rear triangle is constructed with high-modulus carbon fibre to ensure indefinite fatigue life of the flex stays. UD carbon fibre has absolute strength in the direction of the fibre. Strategically controlling the fibre lay-up, produces a matrix that is stiff where desired and strong where necessary, with minimum weight addition. The frame is finished in a 3K Twill weave for a robust composite surface that can withstand any demands exerted by the rider.

 

POP geometry adapted for racing


As modern XCO and XCM courses become more technical, we've adapted the bikes to suit not only the current trails, but also where XC is headed. Slacker head angles and longer wheelbases, along with other geometry and suspension tweaks allow for a bike that is more capable and forgiving on the downhills, but does not sacrifice any uphill ability in the process.

 

Silverback_geometry.png

 

Stratos SBC

  • Silverback Asymmetric Stratos Frame, Toray Carbon Fibre, Flex Stays, Oversize Pivots, BOOST, 100mm travel
  • Fox Factory 32 Float SC Boost, 100mm
  • Surface Carbon rims on DTSwiss 240 hubs
  • Weight: 9.99kg (M)

 

Nothing in nature is symmetric. Riding forces are not symmetric. Why should your bike be?

 

Silverback Stratos bike_view.jpg




21 Comments

BaGearA, Sep 12 2019 07:22

Because it looks better

Gerhard Gous, Sep 12 2019 07:30

It's weird

ABrooks, Sep 12 2019 07:42

I still don't get where this bike slots into their lineup...They still show the Sesta on their website as well as this bike, so will this replace the Sesta eventually or is it for a different category of racing?

The asymmetry looks weird, beautiful bike in person, but still looks weird. We tend to seek out symmetry in everything.

morneS555, Sep 12 2019 08:06

just needs a lefty now to complete the 'look' hehe

 

i think it looks cool though.

Steven Knoetze (sk27), Sep 12 2019 08:16

just needs a lefty now to complete the 'look' hehe

 

i think it looks cool though.

 

Will it pull to one side if you did that or would the lefty face the other way to balance it out???

 

Must say I concur with the other comments. I saw it at Cyclelab and not only does it look weird, it looks wrong....... IMO

Christofison, Sep 12 2019 08:20

I wonder if the additional flex will be noticeable when cornering hard left?

RocknRolla, Sep 12 2019 08:51

More gimmick marketing.

Hairy, Sep 12 2019 09:06

It gets me a little excited I must say ... the AL version has some great looking geo for a 120mm travel 29er trail bike!

Hairy, Sep 12 2019 09:20

More gimmick marketing.

I have it on goo authority that this frame has been properly stress tested and it has stood up well.

 

The promo add though is a bit tacky and cheese, and not in a good way like the Trek Goldilocks promo.

Headshot, Sep 12 2019 11:23

Someone asked me if my Spaz Enduro was a Silverback the other day. Thanks Silverback :-) 

Mozzi, Sep 12 2019 11:54

just needs a lefty now to complete the 'look' hehe

 

i think it looks cool though.

 

 

LOL.. now they just have to make a "righty".... then it will balance nicely...  do you think the big C owns the rights to the "lefy" and the "righty"

 

lll.jpg

timhoek, Sep 12 2019 12:05

I wonder if the additional flex will be noticeable when cornering hard left?

 I had the Sesta and now have the Startos. This Bike is definitely stiffer than the Sesta. And no...no more flex to the left than the right. :)

Super Sywurm, Sep 12 2019 12:49

I love my Stratos!!!

Hairy, Sep 12 2019 12:51

Someone asked me if my Spaz Enduro was a Silverback the other day. Thanks Silverback :-)

I hope you took the compliment gracefully

BikeisLife, Sep 12 2019 02:31

It looks even better in person! Love my Stratos and the stiffness of the frame. Handles like a dream, even when things get gnarly. 

GrahamS2, Sep 13 2019 01:18

I wouldn't exactly call this new or innovative. Intense Primer and Specialized Stumpy have had asymmetric frame designs for years. I'm sure there are plenty other out there too.

arendoog, Sep 13 2019 06:53

Nice bike ! but biggest size is smaller  than most other brands XL .Effective top tube is max 625mm .It looks closer to a M/L than a L.Riders over 180cm don't bother

Hairy, Sep 13 2019 01:28

Assymetric is the new black?

 

But seriously, it makes sense.

 

Others are also doing it

https://www.pinkbike...-chilleasy.html

DieselnDust, Sep 13 2019 01:28

Nice bike ! but biggest size is smaller  than most other brands XL .Effective top tube is max 625mm .It looks closer to a M/L than a L.Riders over 180cm don't bother

 

 

I don't understand your point? How much longer should it be if the rider is over 180cm? Its an XC race bike not an Enduro tank.

 

the reach figures already longer than many similar sized XC bikes e.g. Cannondale Scalpel. the Stratos is very much in line with the trend if a whisker shorter. Race bikes work best with 70-90mm stems

BikeisLife, Sep 13 2019 02:15

Nice bike ! but biggest size is smaller  than most other brands XL .Effective top tube is max 625mm .It looks closer to a M/L than a L.Riders over 180cm don't bother

I'm over 180 cm and fit perfectly on the L, actually feel better fitted than on my previous L frame bike. 

V18, Sep 14 2019 12:45

Saw them the other day. Love how the bottle cage is offset and using the asym downtube. Most impressive thing for me was the massive main linkage bb. Same as a headset. Next bike wil have this. Waiting on the new 29er enduro of them to release. Fingers crossed on raw finish. Well done silverback.