Volunteers wanted for UCT study on LCHF cy...

box2trail's Photo box2trail 14 Jul 2017

We are recruiting well-trained cyclists or triathletes who are following a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet for a study at the Sport Science Institute of South Africa, Cape Town.

 

Please consider the attached advert and contact me for more information!

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  • Advert.JPG

Edited by box2trail, 14 July 2017 - 01:53 .
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mecheng89's Photo mecheng89 14 Jul 2017

Huge pity it's down there, I'd love to take part but am based in JHB!

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box2trail's Photo box2trail 15 Jul 2017

We are recruiting well-trained cyclists or triathletes who are following a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet for a study at the Sport Science Institute of South Africa, Cape Town.

 

Please consider the attached advert and contact me for more information!

Attached Images

  • CRD4 Initial advert.jpg

Edited by box2trail, 16 July 2017 - 02:23 .
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Theunissa's Photo Theunissa 15 Jul 2017

Sounds like sienctist are starting to agree with banting diet
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Tristand's Photo Tristand 15 Jul 2017

Or more like Tim Noaks is fishing for evidence. Not a coincidence that it is UCT.
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Heel Drop's Photo Heel Drop 16 Jul 2017

ssiesa man

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ChrisF's Photo ChrisF 16 Jul 2017

Or more like Tim Noaks is fishing for evidence. Not a coincidence that it is UCT.

 

uhm jaaaa .....

 

surely need more than a few weeks to really check "before" and "after" to make any worthwhile deductions ....

 

 

and even then - to find markers between an eating plan and sports output ... conveniently ignoring the real debate - health issues surrounding excess fat ....

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Jewbacca's Photo Jewbacca 16 Jul 2017

Maybe it's ironic and they are actually LOOKING for cyclists who follow that diet... #doyouexist

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Tristand's Photo Tristand 16 Jul 2017

uhm jaaaa .....
 
surely need more than a few weeks to really check "before" and "after" to make any worthwhile deductions ....
 
 
and even then - to find markers between an eating plan and sports output ... conveniently ignoring the real debate - health issues surrounding excess fat ....


Part of the problem with low carb / high fat diets is that they significantly increase insulin resistance in the longer run. So your ability to burn carbs effectively decreases. The ratio of fat to carbohydrate burning increasing has more to do with carbs dropping than fat increasing. There is a crossover effect.
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lechatnoir's Photo lechatnoir 16 Jul 2017

Part of the problem with low carb / high fat diets is that they significantly increase insulin resistance in the longer run. So your ability to burn carbs effectively decreases. The ratio of fat to carbohydrate burning increasing has more to do with carbs dropping than fat increasing. There is a crossover effect.


That sounds interesting. Mind citing a peer-reviewed study? Thanks
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Pulse's Photo Pulse 16 Jul 2017

Part of the problem with low carb / high fat diets is that they significantly increase insulin resistance in the longer run. So your ability to burn carbs effectively decreases. The ratio of fat to carbohydrate burning increasing has more to do with carbs dropping than fat increasing. There is a crossover effect.


I can't see how this would work. If the intake of carbs is decreased, the release of insilin would also decrease, which should result in an upregulation of receptors (or at least maintain receptor levels). It might decrease/delay the 1st/2nd insulin release processes (I'm guessing here - have not seen any research) but should not increase resistance.

Ot would be interesting if you have some references for this
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Tristand's Photo Tristand 16 Jul 2017

I can't see how this would work. If the intake of carbs is decreased, the release of insilin would also decrease, which should result in an upregulation of receptors (or at least maintain receptor levels). It might decrease/delay the 1st/2nd insulin release processes (I'm guessing here - have not seen any research) but should not increase resistance.

Ot would be interesting if you have some references for this

 

It is not really the drop in carbohydrates, it is the increase in saturated fats. Fats, specifically saturated fats significantly increase insulin resistance. 

(Rat study but close enough, http://diabetes.diab.../11/1397.short)

 

Most of the high-fat studies being performed are on obese people. Their insulin resistance seems to come down during the study but that is probably the effect of weight loss. Up until the factors cross over. I had copy of a study that talked about the cross over effect but I can't for the life of me find it.

 

The following article is very interesting "food for thought" on the whole low/high carb debate.

https://www.scienced...70317132004.htm

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Tristand's Photo Tristand 16 Jul 2017

"High-carbohydrate, high-fiber diets increase peripheral insulin sensitivity in healthy young and old adults."

 

http://ajcn.nutritio.../3/524.abstract

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gogo@'s Photo gogo@ 16 Jul 2017

"High-carbohydrate, high-fiber diets increase peripheral insulin sensitivity in healthy young and old adults."

http://ajcn.nutritio.../3/524.abstract


http://www.foodpolit...y-of-nutrition/
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Pulse's Photo Pulse 16 Jul 2017

It is not really the drop in carbohydrates, it is the increase in saturated fats. Fats, specifically saturated fats significantly increase insulin resistance.
(Rat study but close enough, http://diabetes.diab.../11/1397.short)

Most of the high-fat studies being performed are on obese people. Their insulin resistance seems to come down during the study but that is probably the effect of weight loss. Up until the factors cross over. I had copy of a study that talked about the cross over effect but I can't for the life of me find it.

The following article is very interesting "food for thought" on the whole low/high carb debate.
https://www.scienced...70317132004.htm


I didn't think of it that way round...

Thanx! I'll have a bit of a read this week, and see if I can find some related stuff
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Tristand's Photo Tristand 16 Jul 2017

The great thing about scientific papers is that they are strictly fact based, not options of the authors. Falsifying or distorting the information presented is a VERY serious offence and can result in the authors being stripped of their credentials, like the anti-vaccine (former dr) Andrew Wakefield.

 

They may choose not to publish if the results don't suit them but that is hardly unexpected. The scientific process may have its hickups, but the process works well when followed through without making hasty conclusions. The far bigger problem is that public belief of what the facts are is often far from the truth, and social media is only making this worse. "Someone on the internet says....".  

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